tend

tend [ tend ] verb ***
1. ) intransitive to usually do a particular thing:
tend to do something: He tends to exaggerate.
The gym tends to get very busy at around six o'clock.
We tend to take technology for granted nowadays.
These arguments tend merely to confuse the reader.
tend not to do something: Religion is personal and I tend not to talk about it.
a ) tend toward to usually have a particular quality:
Her study found that sociologists tended toward liberalism and radicalism.
2. ) intransitive or transitive to take care of someone or something:
Eddie kept himself busy tending the garden.
A team of army doctors were tending the wounded.
tend to: I have to tend to the children before I go out.
3. ) intransitive tend toward/upward/downward to change or develop in a particular direction:
I think they will tend toward stricter controls.
Housing prices have tended upward.
tend bar AMERICAN
to work behind a bar serving drinks

Usage of the words and phrases in modern English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tend — tend …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Tend — Tend, v. i. [F. tendre, L. tendere, tensum and tentum, to stretch, extend, direct one s course, tend; akin to Gr. ? to stretch, Skr. tan. See {Thin}, and cf. {Tend} to attend, {Contend}, {Intense}, {Ostensible}, {Portent}, {Tempt}, {Tender} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tend — Tend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tending}.] [Aphetic form of attend. See {Attend}, {Tend} to move, and cf. {Tender} one that tends or attends.] 1. To accompany as an assistant or protector; to care for the wants of; to look… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tend — W1S1 [tend] v [Sense: 1, 3, 5; Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: tendre to stretch , from Latin tendere] [Sense: 2, 4; Date: 1100 1200; Origin: attend] 1.) tend to do sth if something tends to happen, it happens often and is likely to happen …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • tend — tend1 [tend] vt. [ME tenden, aphetic < attenden: see ATTEND] 1. to take care of; minister to; watch over; look after; attend to [to tend plants or animals, to tend the sick] 2. to be in charge of or at work at; manage or operate [to tend a… …   English World dictionary

  • tend — /tend/ verb 1 tend to do sth to often do a particular thing, especially something that is bad or annoying, and to be likely to do it again: Sally tends to interfere in other people s business. | The car does tend to overheat. 2 tend towards sth… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • tend — tend, attend, mind, watch are comparable when they mean to take charge of or look after someone or something especially as a duty or in return for remuneration. Tend usually retains some notion of an earlier sense in which it means to pay… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • tend*/*/*/ — [tend] verb 1) [I] to usually do a particular thing He tends to exaggerate.[/ex] I tend not to go out so much in the winter.[/ex] 2) [I/T] to take care of someone or something Eddie kept himself busy tending the garden.[/ex] Doctors were tending… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • Tend — Tend, v. i. 1. To wait, as attendants or servants; to serve; to attend; with on or upon. [1913 Webster] Was he not companion with the riotous knights That tend upon my father? Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. [F. attendre.] To await; to expect. [Obs.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tend — Ⅰ. tend [1] ► VERB 1) frequently behave in a particular way or have a certain characteristic. 2) go or move in a particular direction. ORIGIN Latin tendere stretch, tend . Ⅱ. tend [2] ► …   English terms dictionary

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